MeansMotivationNutritionRecipes

The apple (malus domestic) – a fruit that has a long history, is healthy and offers a wide range of culinary options

The apple tree, which comes from the rose family, is now one of the native precious woods. However, it originally came from Central and West Asia. The apple reached northern Europe from Italy during the campaigns of the Romans around 100 BC. Apples were cultivated in Europe as early as the first century AD but remained a "luxury" fruit until modern times. This is demonstrated by both the symbolism attached to them throughout history and their mystical status in fairy tales.

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Ecological measures that help to preserve quality of life and the health of all living beings

Wind energy and photovoltaics can be combined in different ways and contribute to the reorientation of ecosystems. Cost considerations and opportunities have changed. Various national economies worldwide are working on integrating these new methods of energy production into their systems in a way that makes sense from both a social and a microeconomic point of view. In many places, such projects continue to progress slowly and do not yet allow the economy and ecology to harmonise as desired.

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A medicinal kitchen herb

Rosemary This finely scented, evergreen shrub with needle-like leaves has been used in the Mediterranean since ancient times and was dedicated to the goddess Aphrodite as a symbol of love and beauty. Known as a medicinal herb since the Middle Ages, rosemary remains indispensable in the kitchen today. Rosemary contains iron, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and vitamins A and C. The fresh "needles" (shoot tips) of rosemary are a key spice used throughout the year in Mediterranean cuisine and, depending on people’s taste, go well with almost everything. When vegetables, pizza, meat, cheese and salads are prepared with rosemary, its delicate scent is immediately recognisable in the kitchen.

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The optimum room temperature for sleeping

The optimum room temperature in living spaces is usually between 20 and 22°C. It should be a bit cooler for sleeping, around 17 to 20°C. What steps should you consider taking if previous measures you consistently implemented result in you still feeling tired and exhausted, even after a good night's sleep? Perhaps the air in the room is too dry, and your sleep at night is disturbed. In addition to the temperature, air humidity is a decisive factor for restful sleep. A healthy humidity range is between a minimum of 40 and a maximum of 60 per cent relative humidity. As the airways do not dry out so quickly within this range, sleep quality improves over the long term.

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Healthy sleep cannot be taken for granted

On average, people spend a third of the day sleeping or at least struggling to sleep. So, if you live to be 85, you will have spent around 28 years sleeping. However, sleep problems are increasingly burdening our “meritocracy”. Noise pollution, apartments that are too cold or too warm, and poor air quality can impair sleep quality. Due to stress and overload, necessary measures are often not implemented. As mentioned in previous articles, the temperature in your bedroom should be 18°C, something that has even become legal and medical consensus. This applies to Switzerland and many European countries, where most people have a bed, blanket and pillow. Many well-insulated apartments tempt you to wear light or no nightwear, even in winter. The latter is generally unhealthy.

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Pumpkin time

Peel the pumpkin, remove the seeds and cut into large wedges. Rinse with cold water and cook slowly until the vegetable wilts. Mash or mix. Add two to three bay leaves, depending on the desired portion, 3-4 heaped tablespoons of chives and parsley (fresh or freeze-dried) and fresh or dried peperoncini peppers to taste. Stir in a tablespoon of Morga fat-free vegetable stock as desired. Next, add two tablespoons of olive oil and some water if necessary and simmer gently for another half hour, stirring occasionally.

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Now the plums are ripe

Prunes contain iron, calcium, potassium, magnesium and phosphate. The B vitamins act as a balm for the nervous system and boost your metabolism. The dyes, especially those in the peel, have an antioxidative effect. They are good for the heart and help to protect against cancer.

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Frowner’s Thai autumn rolls

Six autumn rolls Add two tablespoons of soy sauce, two tablespoons of Sriracha chilli sauce, two tablespoons of chives, and some dried Thai chilli to a bowl and mix. Next, add 250 g of cabbage, chopped and washed, 250 g of washed soybean sprouts, two carrots, washed, peeled and sliced lengthways, and a few washed pepper strips. Mix carefully. Fill a bowl with warm water. Briefly add the spring roll wrappers (Thai kitchen) to the warm water individually. Lay carefully on a dry cloth.

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Vegan Lentil Curry

Lentils are low in calories and rich in fibre. People who follow a vegan diet in particular should ensure that they have a sufficient protein intake. With 23 g of protein per 100 g, lentils are one of the most high-protein foodstuffs. When combined with rice and grains, they provide all the important amino acids. Protein supports cell building and muscle growth and strengthens the endocrine and enzyme systems. Curry paste contains many healthy spices, it is easily digestible (no bloating or flatulence), it supports digestion and is anti-inflammatory.

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Series – Tips from the World of Naturopathy

Salads, vegetables, fruit and berries should be carefully and thoroughly washed. The best way to do this is to briefly place them in a salad strainer along with cold diluted vinegar before draining and rinsing two or three times in cold water. Place on a kitchen towel to dry or use this to wipe them down. Vinegar has an antibacterial effect. Cleaning fruit and vegetables in this way removes pesticides and chemical substances. A whitish film will often form on the surface of the water. This consists of substances that have been washed away – ones that in all likelihood no one would want to eat with their meal. This type of cleaning is particularly important when fruit and vegetables are being eaten raw. Add 100 millilitres of vinegar to a bowl of water. Berries can be added with some lemon juice and a pinch of sea salt. Always be sure to rinse well and dry.

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Quick Vegan Apricot Tart

Ingredients 1 packet of spelt cake mix (spelt flour 44%, water, vegetable oil (rapeseed, hydrogenated rapeseed, olive), wholemeal spelt flour 11%, iodized cooking salt, wheat flour, acidifying agents: citric acid, preservative: E202) The

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Scandinavian Wonder Bread

Preparation Add the baking mixture to a bowl, pour in the water and mix well with a mixer, using the dough hook attachment. Mix further using the whisk attachment. Shape the dough into a loaf, cover the bowl and leave in the fridge overnight. The next morning, cover the oven grid with baking paper and place in the centre or lower part of the oven. Bake the bread for 80 minutes at 200°C (select upper and lower heat). The oven should not be preheated. The baking mixture can also be used to make small bread rolls or crispbread.

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Vegan Salad with spelt “Hörnli” (Swiss small, curved macaroni)

Preparation Add the “Hörnli” and chopped pepperoncini peppers to salted water and bring to the boil. Cook al dente and drain well. Add some olive oil to a pan along with the “Hörnli”. Turn off the heat and briefly stir. Leave to dry in a sieve on a towel. Wash the peppers and zucchini and chop finely. Combine 2-3 tablespoons of the salad seasoning mix with the white wine vinegar and stir to a paste. Add olive oil and stir until it has reached the consistency of a sauce. Fold in a small tube worth of vegan mayonnaise and thin down with approximately 2 tablespoons of the soya cream. Season well with pepper. Add the finely chopped parsley, chives, peppers and zucchini and mix well with the warm “Hörnli”. If needed, season further to taste. The remaining 100g or so of “Hörnli” can be used for other dishes. Serve warm or cold. This recipe can be easily stored in Tupperware in the fridge and enjoyed the next day.

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Melon and Blueberry Salad

Preparation Wash the melons and core the Charentais Chop finely Wash the blueberries and place on a towel to dry Add 100ml of lemon juice to a pan along with the sugar and cherries and bring to the boil. Stir with a whisk (taste briefly with a teaspoon - the quantity of sugar can be adjusted according to the sweetness of the lemons and the fruits, as well as personal taste) Pour the hot mixture over the fruits Mix well with salad servers and garnish with the peppermint leaves

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Frowner Lentil Salad

If you are using the whole packet for the Frowner salad, be sure to have a large bowl on hand. Mix 1 and a half packets of the salad herb mixture with the white wine vinegar and a good quantity of pepper until a thick sauce is formed (paste). Whisk in the olive oil until the sauce has reached a good consistency (add a touch of soy sauce to taste). Otherwise use less salad herb mixture.

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