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Caraway – a spice, a culinary delight and a medicine all at once

Always carrying caraway on you is cheaper and preventative, especially if you have to eat out. Almost every salad is easier to digest if you sprinkle some caraway seeds on it. It is, of course, particularly digestible when served with all types of cabbage and pulses, and it is a special treat when sprinkled on raw beetroot, carrot and celery salads. Caraway also goes well with cheese and potatoes. If you love cheese fondue, you can do without the schnapps afterwards with caraway, or you can go straight for caraway schnapps (a popular spirit, especially in northern Germany). This tangy spice can also be used in sauces, soups, bread, and savoury cakes and pastries.

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Frowner’s fruit tiramisu with pomegranate seeds

Wash, dry, and pit the fruit and cut it into small pieces if necessary. In a bowl, mix the vegan whipped cream with the quark cream. You can also use vegan quark. Cover the bottom of a sealable glass dish with the cream. Add the seeds, mango slices, and a few chopped orange slices to taste. Place the ladyfingers (sugared side down) on top of the seeds and mango, packing them tightly together, and press down. Drizzle over some freshly squeezed orange juice and pomegranate juice. Again, cover well with the mixture of vanilla quark and vegan whipped cream, add another layer of fruit, press down another layer of ladyfingers, drizzle with juice, and sprinkle with more seeds if you like. Cover with the rest of the cream. Seal and leave in the fridge for at least 24 hours (preferably 48 hours).

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Boost your immune system and mood with oranges

In Europe, oranges are harvested from August (early varieties from Seville) to May (late variety from Tardivo di Sanvito, Sardinia). The most prominent orange-based product in global trade is orange juice, which mostly comes from Brazil and is traded in the form of concentrate (syrup). Fresh oranges have also become firmly established in the food industry in numerous countries. Oranges are often sold in an orange wrapper, a practice which used to be carried out for protective purposes but is now used as an advertising tool.

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The Day of the Dead – We celebrate life!

Every year in many parts of Mexico, but especially in the traditional south of the country, revellers wear colourful costumes, hold pageants and parties, sing, dance and offer gifts to the departed. In 2008, UNESCO included the "Dia de los Muertos" in its representative list of intangible cultural heritage of humanity. Although the festivities are celebrated by almost all Mexicans today, they date back several thousand years to the region's indigenous people. In the cultures of the Aztecs, Maya and other peoples, mourning the dead was considered disrespectful. For them, death was a natural phase in the life cycle, and the deceased were symbolically kept alive in spirit and memories. During Hanal Pixán, as the Mayan festival is called, the souls of the dead are believed to return to the realm of the living temporarily.

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Frowner’s Winter Salad

As it is high in the red pigment betanin, beetroot has a strong protective effect. The ancient Egyptians recognised the healing powers of the celery root. The Indians and Romans also valued the detoxifying effects of the strongly scented tuber. Celery found its way to Europe in the 8th century AD. Carrots contain more beta-carotene than any other vegetable. The body converts this into vitamin A, which has a strengthening effect on the eyes. This also protects the cells against free radicals. Two carrots a day are enough to meet your daily requirement.

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Aubergines (Solanum melongena) – healthy and quick to prepare

The aubergine was introduced to Spain in the 13th century and subsequently made its way to Italy. The first verifiable examples of it being cultivated can be traced back to China, although this is also suspected to have taken place in India. Because of its bitter taste, the aubergine was first used as an ornamental plant in Europe. Called "devil's egg" by Arabs, the French term "aubergine" became established. "Melanzana" is the name of the vegetable/fruit in Italy, which means "unhealthy fruit". "Eggplant" is what the aubergine is called in parts of the English-speaking world (US, Canada, Australia). This name refers to an old aubergine variety that was the size and colour of a hen's egg.

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Cauliflower season has begun

Cauliflower is a flowering vegetable, as its name suggests – its name comes from the many flowers on the inflorescence. Cauliflower is sold all year round. Anyone who values fresh, regional products in Switzerland will likely prefer to buy from October to April. Cauliflowers should be prepared as carefully as possible to preserve the many vital substances they contain. However, they can also be eaten raw. This way, the goodness in the cauliflower will not be lost. Cauliflower contains a lot of water, is low in calories (25 calories per 100 grams), high in fibre and therefore easy to digest.

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Apple and mango puree with orange

The virtues of apples and relevant health-related aspects have already been discussed on frowner.blog. Mangoes are just as healthy and go well with apples or berries. This fruit is a source of vitamins C, E and B and is very healthy despite its high fructose content. It is also rich in beta-carotene, a precursor of vitamin A. Mangoes "supply" three grams of beta-carotene per 100 grams of pulp, as well as essential minerals such as potassium, calcium and magnesium.

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‘Pink’ chia power pudding

The seeds of the chia plant (Salvia Helvetica) are rich in dietary fibre and are therefore considered very filling. Chia seeds swell up a lot when placed in liquids because they can absorb 25 times their weight in water. This increases the weight up to 10 times and therefore the volume of a meal. However, the amount of calories remains constant, and the satiated feeling lasts longer. Chia seeds are good for low-calorie diets. Chia seeds have been approved in the EU since 2013. At that time, they were a novel foodstuff. Originally from Mexico, the chia plant is cultivated in many Latin American countries and was a basic foodstuff and remedy of the ancient Maya people. Chia seeds outperform many other tried and tested foodstuffs in terms of the amount of antioxidants, calcium, potassium, iron, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids they contain. "Chia" is a Mayan expression and aptly means "strength".

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Dates – the healthy substitute for sweets

The many healthy ingredients in dates can support the metabolism, the nervous system and the heart muscles and lower LDL cholesterol. According to various studies, B vitamins can have a calming effect on people suffering from nervousness and general restlessness. B vitamins are also known to lower blood pressure. Dates contain B3 and B5 vitamins. So, this fruit can also be enjoyed in the evening without any problems. This is also down to the fact that dates contain amino acids. For example, the amino acid tryptophan is a precursor to serotonin. Tryptophan can be converted to melatonin. This hormone binds to nerve cells in the brain and can therefore also have a calming effect and relieve nervousness and insomnia.

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Ligurian flatbread with rosemary – focaccia

Sauté one finely chopped onion in olive oil and a tablespoon of whiskey and add finely chopped frozen spinach. Next, add 200 ml of water mixed with 1 level tablespoon of fat-free Morga bouillon powder, some pepperoncini and two bay leaves and simmer. Drain and allow to cool in the colander. Place on a kitchen towel and remove the bay leaves. Spread another handful of frowner's focaccia dough out on a baking tray lined with baking paper. Prick with a fork and brush with olive oil. Add 3-4 finely chopped tomato slices to the dough. Top with a few rosemary needles. Add the spinach (to a height of 1.5 cm) using a spoon and leave some space around the edges. Lay the finely cut mozzarella slices on top of the spinach, sprinkle with pizza seasoning and brush with olive oil.

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Zucchini pasta al frowner

Immigrants brought zucchini to Europe in the 17th century. Zucchini belong to the "pumpkin family", and the name is derived from the Italian term "Zucca", meaning pumpkin. This vegetable comes in different shapes and colours. It is usually harvested when half-ripe. The skin of tiny, hard zucchini is more delicate and softer at this point and can be stored cool for around ten days. The larger they are, the less flavourful they tend to be. Depending on the growing conditions and particularly if they are stored for too long, bitter substances can form, which are very unhealthy in higher concentrations. That is why it is best to always try a slice of zucchini before using it. If the taste is unusually bitter, it should not be eaten. Bitter zucchini can spoil an entire meal.

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Arugula (Eruca sativa)

The arugula plant boosts the immune system and is low in calories. Rocket salad is highly nutritious, has antioxidant properties and helps improve the function of almost every system in the body. Studies have demonstrated that it can improve heart health and reduce inflammation thanks to phytonutrients. Oxidative stress can be reduced, damage caused by free radicals combatted, and the ageing process can be slowed down.

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The apple (malus domestic) – a fruit that has a long history, is healthy and offers a wide range of culinary options

The apple tree, which comes from the rose family, is now one of the native precious woods. However, it originally came from Central and West Asia. The apple reached northern Europe from Italy during the campaigns of the Romans around 100 BC. Apples were cultivated in Europe as early as the first century AD but remained a "luxury" fruit until modern times. This is demonstrated by both the symbolism attached to them throughout history and their mystical status in fairy tales.

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Ecological measures that help to preserve quality of life and the health of all living beings

Wind energy and photovoltaics can be combined in different ways and contribute to the reorientation of ecosystems. Cost considerations and opportunities have changed. Various national economies worldwide are working on integrating these new methods of energy production into their systems in a way that makes sense from both a social and a microeconomic point of view. In many places, such projects continue to progress slowly and do not yet allow the economy and ecology to harmonise as desired.

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A medicinal kitchen herb

Rosemary This finely scented, evergreen shrub with needle-like leaves has been used in the Mediterranean since ancient times and was dedicated to the goddess Aphrodite as a symbol of love and beauty. Known as a medicinal herb since the Middle Ages, rosemary remains indispensable in the kitchen today. Rosemary contains iron, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and vitamins A and C. The fresh "needles" (shoot tips) of rosemary are a key spice used throughout the year in Mediterranean cuisine and, depending on people’s taste, go well with almost everything. When vegetables, pizza, meat, cheese and salads are prepared with rosemary, its delicate scent is immediately recognisable in the kitchen.

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The optimum room temperature for sleeping

The optimum room temperature in living spaces is usually between 20 and 22°C. It should be a bit cooler for sleeping, around 17 to 20°C. What steps should you consider taking if previous measures you consistently implemented result in you still feeling tired and exhausted, even after a good night's sleep? Perhaps the air in the room is too dry, and your sleep at night is disturbed. In addition to the temperature, air humidity is a decisive factor for restful sleep. A healthy humidity range is between a minimum of 40 and a maximum of 60 per cent relative humidity. As the airways do not dry out so quickly within this range, sleep quality improves over the long term.

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Healthy sleep cannot be taken for granted

On average, people spend a third of the day sleeping or at least struggling to sleep. So, if you live to be 85, you will have spent around 28 years sleeping. However, sleep problems are increasingly burdening our “meritocracy”. Noise pollution, apartments that are too cold or too warm, and poor air quality can impair sleep quality. Due to stress and overload, necessary measures are often not implemented. As mentioned in previous articles, the temperature in your bedroom should be 18°C, something that has even become legal and medical consensus. This applies to Switzerland and many European countries, where most people have a bed, blanket and pillow. Many well-insulated apartments tempt you to wear light or no nightwear, even in winter. The latter is generally unhealthy.

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Pumpkin time

Peel the pumpkin, remove the seeds and cut into large wedges. Rinse with cold water and cook slowly until the vegetable wilts. Mash or mix. Add two to three bay leaves, depending on the desired portion, 3-4 heaped tablespoons of chives and parsley (fresh or freeze-dried) and fresh or dried peperoncini peppers to taste. Stir in a tablespoon of Morga fat-free vegetable stock as desired. Next, add two tablespoons of olive oil and some water if necessary and simmer gently for another half hour, stirring occasionally.

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Now the plums are ripe

Prunes contain iron, calcium, potassium, magnesium and phosphate. The B vitamins act as a balm for the nervous system and boost your metabolism. The dyes, especially those in the peel, have an antioxidative effect. They are good for the heart and help to protect against cancer.

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Frowner’s Thai autumn rolls

Six autumn rolls Add two tablespoons of soy sauce, two tablespoons of Sriracha chilli sauce, two tablespoons of chives, and some dried Thai chilli to a bowl and mix. Next, add 250 g of cabbage, chopped and washed, 250 g of washed soybean sprouts, two carrots, washed, peeled and sliced lengthways, and a few washed pepper strips. Mix carefully. Fill a bowl with warm water. Briefly add the spring roll wrappers (Thai kitchen) to the warm water individually. Lay carefully on a dry cloth.

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Vegan Lentil Curry

Lentils are low in calories and rich in fibre. People who follow a vegan diet in particular should ensure that they have a sufficient protein intake. With 23 g of protein per 100 g, lentils are one of the most high-protein foodstuffs. When combined with rice and grains, they provide all the important amino acids. Protein supports cell building and muscle growth and strengthens the endocrine and enzyme systems. Curry paste contains many healthy spices, it is easily digestible (no bloating or flatulence), it supports digestion and is anti-inflammatory.

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Series – Tips from the World of Naturopathy

Salads, vegetables, fruit and berries should be carefully and thoroughly washed. The best way to do this is to briefly place them in a salad strainer along with cold diluted vinegar before draining and rinsing two or three times in cold water. Place on a kitchen towel to dry or use this to wipe them down. Vinegar has an antibacterial effect. Cleaning fruit and vegetables in this way removes pesticides and chemical substances. A whitish film will often form on the surface of the water. This consists of substances that have been washed away – ones that in all likelihood no one would want to eat with their meal. This type of cleaning is particularly important when fruit and vegetables are being eaten raw. Add 100 millilitres of vinegar to a bowl of water. Berries can be added with some lemon juice and a pinch of sea salt. Always be sure to rinse well and dry.

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Quick Vegan Apricot Tart

Ingredients 1 packet of spelt cake mix (spelt flour 44%, water, vegetable oil (rapeseed, hydrogenated rapeseed, olive), wholemeal spelt flour 11%, iodized cooking salt, wheat flour, acidifying agents: citric acid, preservative: E202) The

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